4 Practical Tips to Keep Students Reading Over Winter Break

Winter break is quickly approaching! Whether your school break is one, two, or three weeks in duration, the fact is that these upcoming days off are still valuable ones in the lives of all readers, regardless of their grade in school or stage of reading development. From kindergarteners to high schoolers, and even beyond, reading matters (for more on why reading matters, I highly recommend this 2015 blog post from Donalyn Miller).  To keep students reading over break, here are four practical tips that I have seen work in the past, and that I plan to make use of in my nine teaching days before winter break.

1. Provide access to books. Books cannot be read if access is not granted. Consider taking a small bit of time to spruce up the classroom library- highlight a few book boxes, enlist students in organizing books in a way that makes sense to them (students love creating book boxes in the library!), and refer to the library as often as possible throughout the day. Make it the focal point of everything in the classroom. Also, consider asking your school librarian for support with book access. Perhaps your class can spend some time in the library before winter break. Take a look here if you’re still thinking of ways to grow and maintain your classroom library.

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2. Once access is established, invite kids to freely choose a few books to take home. As JK Rowling reminds us, “If you don’t like to read, you haven’t found the right book.” And, according to Allington and Gabriel (2012), “Students read more, understand more, and are more likely to continue reading when they have the opportunity to choose what they read.” This applies not only to children, but also to adolescents, teens, and adults as well. Before winter break arrives, consider spending some time in class inviting students to choose a few books to take home. It is more likely they will read at home if they get to pick out the reading material themselves. Worried about losing books from your classroom library? Simply ask students to keep track of the books they have borrowed- rarely do books not come back, but it can happen. There is always a risk of a couple books being lost, but the risk is even greater for students if books sit unread on shelves over break instead of in the hands of readers. Books are meant to be read, not collected on shelves.  If inviting students to choose their own books is new to you and your readers, Kari Yates and I have a few tips and tricks to support students in book choice.

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3. Make a plan with Your Readers. One of the habits of healthy readers is consistently making plans for reading. By inviting students to think about when they’ll read, where they’ll read, what they’ll read, and possibly with whom they’ll read over the break, they are more likely to actually read. These plans can be jotted in notebooks, written in planners or calendars, typed up, and even shared with friends and family. As human beings, we’re more likely to do something that we make specific plans to do. We’re even more likely to do something when we share those plans with others. Reading is so critical in the growth of all students, we can’t just leave it to chance. Taking time to make a plan has the power to increase the chances of students reading over the break from school.

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4. Let students know that the first day after winter break they will chat about their reading. One of the most authentic ways to respond to reading is to invite conversation. Before students leave for the break, let them know that the class is going to casually chat about their winter break reading upon return. This chat, and ones like it, are not an assignment, a method for accountability, or a ‘gotcha’ in any way. Rather, they are what we do- we regularly chat about books. We chat about them in our daily morning meetings, during reading workshop, and often times through more visual means (as seen below). When talk and interaction around books becomes a way of life in the classroom, students will read more. They will want to get in on the action and connection that reading offers. They will want to be a part of the conversation. If chat around books is new to you, or if you’re looking for different ideas, you can find some support here and here.

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As a recap…

1. Provide access to books.

2. Invite kids to freely choose a few books to take home.

3. Make a plan with Your Readers.

4. Remind students about upcoming chats about reading after break.

I’d love to hear your thoughts and what you plan to do to encourage your students to keep the reading going over break!  Happy reading, friends!

 

Allington & Gabriel. 2012. “Every Child, Every Day.” Educational Leadership 69: 10-15.

 

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My first book for teachers, To Know and Nurture a Reader: Conferring with Confidence and Joy, cowritten with Kari Yates, is now out and available from Stenhouse Publishers. Our goal with this book was to help teachers make the important practice of conferring with readers manageable, effective, and joyful! 

It’s Monday! What are you reading? 11/12/18

As I prepare to head off to my favorite weekend of the entire year, the annual NCTE convention, I am revisiting a few books that have played a role in shaping my path as a literacy educator. Today, I am giving much of my attention to two texts that have had a huge impact on the language choices I make in my classroom.

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Jan Burkins and Kim Yaris challenged me to grow as an educator by shifting the bulk of the work to my students in their groundbreaking book, Who’s Doing the Work? Since its release in 2016, it has been read and reread in heavy rotation as a part of my professional reading life. Jan and Kim have truly helped me say less and choose my words carefully to elevate my students’ learning.

 

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My writing partner, Kari Yates, and I have been thinking deeply about talk lately. Specifically, we have been thinking about how our teacher language impacts the relationships with and learning of our students. A pivotal text that has helped guide my thinking here is Peter Johnston’s Choice Words. This book is a gift to the profession.

 

You can find more of my current professional reads, 5th grade classroom read alouds, and my relax reads here. Happy reading, friends!

 

 

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My first book for teachers, To Know and Nurture a Reader: Conferring with Confidence and Joy, cowritten with Kari Yates, is now out and available from Stenhouse Publishers. Our goal with this book was to help teachers make the important practice of conferring with readers manageable, effective, and joyful! 

 

 

 

We are Changed Because of Our Daily Stories

 

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Our 40th shared story… Thank you, Yuyi Morales for this wonderful book!

Today was our 40th day of school.  After lunch, I read aloud our 40th picture book of the year. During that read aloud, it dawned on me that we were having natural conversation about the book during reading. I didn’t plan it out, prepare questions, or come in with learning targets or goals. I didn’t even ask my students to stop and jot, turn and talk, or to raise their hands. I simply started reading a wonderful book, and the rest took care of itself. But, this certainly didn’t happen overnight.

When you read a book aloud every single day with your class, this is what happens. A community of readers is fostered and continues to grow. When you take the time to seek out books for students to see themselves and then see others they may not meet in their daily lives, a community of thoughtful, kind, young citizens flourishes!

When I think about the simple things in my classroom that created our community of readers, I have to say there really is not one exact thing, but all other things are supported by the fact that we take the time to share a story together every single day. We do this no matter what- no matter the interruption, assembly, unexpected emergency drill, you name it. We read aloud every single day.

In today’s story, we looked out the metaphorical window into someone else’s life. We learned how stories shaped her life. We related to her through the power of books, love, and recognizing that we are all human beings who come from somewhere else with stories to share. We developed a bit of empathy for others in our community and around the country. It was beautiful.

Our community of readers was created because…

We shared stories… everyday.

We ditched the reading log and worksheets.

We started conversations.

We recommended impactful stories to each other.

We wrote our own stories.

We created meaning together.

We laughed together,

teared up together,

and even questioned together.

We shared stories… everyday.

Thank you to Jillian Heise, Donalyn Miller, and my 5th grade colleague Jennifer Ford for the inspiration to share stories everyday.  Thank you to Yuyi Morales for sharing your story with us today in my 5th grade classroom. We are different people because of your story.

Friends, I encourage you to share stories with your classes and families as well. It changes everything. 

Our stories so far this school year…

Made with Padlet

 

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My first book for teachers, To Know and Nurture a Reader: Conferring with Confidence and Joy, cowritten with Kari Yates, is now out and available from Stenhouse Publishers. Our goal with this book was to help teachers make the important practice of conferring with readers manageable, effective, and joyful! 

Classroom Book A Day: Our Whole Collection!

 “Maggie is so excited about how much you read out loud with the class everyday!” 

After hearing this from a parent at our Back to School Night last week, my commitment to classroom book a day was solidified. We now have 14 days of fifth grade behind us along with 14 picture books that have helped us cultivate our community of readers through read aloud. 14 shared experiences through books. 14 ways our community of readers can now connect with each other. 14 commonalities. This number will continue to grow for every single new day and new book of the school year.

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After each read aloud is completed, we house our books in the Books Read Together bin in the classroom library. As time goes on, I imagine the bin turning into a shelf. Each day during independent reading time, I’ve seen many of our Classroom Book a Day read alouds bring reread and discussed. One of the most beautiful things about a shared classroom read aloud experience is that the book lives on and on long after the time spent reading together is finished.

In addition to keeping our books in a classroom library book bin for constant access, we also have a digital display.  To make our Classroom Book a Day collection visible to students and their families alike, my fifth graders and I created this Padlet. The Padlet will reflect the continually growing collection of shared reads.

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(scroll back/forth and up/down to see every book)

I’d love to know how you’re sharing your classroom read alouds… bulletin board, digital display, basket in the library, something else?  We’re all so excited about the possibilities to come for this year’s Classroom Book a Day commitment. I can’t wait to see where this takes my readers!

Happy Reading, Friends!

Christina 

 

By the way, if you are new to Classroom Book a Day (like I was not too long ago), take a look at this great information from Jillian Heise.

 

 

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My first book for teachers, To Know and Nurture a Reader: Conferring with Confidence and Joy, cowritten with Kari Yates, is now out and available from Stenhouse Publishers. Our goal with this book was to help teachers make the important practice of conferring with readers manageable, effective, and fun! 

 

 

Classroom Book a Day: The First Five Days of School!

“As the year progresses, read aloud becomes the bedrock foundation of who you are and where you’ve traveled together as a reading community. It becomes your history and the collection of stories and experiences that you come back to and draw on throughout the days, the weeks, and the months ahead.”   –Yates & Nosek

Inspired by my friend and colleague, Jennifer Ford, who was inspired by Jillian Heise, who was inspired by Donalyn Miller… I am taking on Classroom Book a Day and am blogging about it!  I shared this goal with my 5th graders today, and they were just thrilled. So far, we are five days in to our school year, and we are right on track.

My plan is not to do a separate blog post about each book (there is no way possible I could keep up with that as a full time classroom teacher, writer, and person trying to live a balanced life outside of school). However, I will periodically post all the books we’ve read for our Classroom Book a Day in one post- I imagine every couple weeks or so.

 

Here’s what we’ve shared together as a reading community so far…

 

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First Day of School

On the first day of school, we read The Name Jar by Yangsook Choi- a wonderful story about how our names shape us and partially help form our identities.

 

 

 

 

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8/15/18

Then, we read ish by Peter Reynolds- a heartwarming book about so many wonderful things. Out of the mouth of a fifth grader today- “We’re all a little bit -ish all the time with different things, and that’s ok!”

 

 

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8/16/18

We followed up ish with Emmanuel’s Dream by Laurie Ann Thompson- You know a book is great when the class applauds at the end and can’t stop talking about it! It also kicked off our identity conversation- we are all more than one story, and we are all more than what may appear to others. Highly recommend this book for all ages- even adults!

 

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8/17/18

This past Friday, we shared the book Most People by Michael Leannah… A great conversation was had about appearances and perceptions. Another great read for all ages.

 

 

 

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8/20/18

Today’s book was was a beautiful story from Katrina Goldsaito: The Sound of Silence. It sparked a wonderful discussion about presence and appreciating the moments we’re in. Sometimes what we’re looking for is within us the whole time.

 

 

What books are you sharing with your class? I’d love to learn more!

Happy reading, friends.

-Christina 

 

 

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My first book for teachers, To Know and Nurture a Reader: Conferring with Confidence and Joy, cowritten with Kari Yates, is now out and available from Stenhouse Publishers. Our goal with this book was to help teachers make the important practice of conferring with readers manageable, effective, and fun!