10 Reasons We Read Aloud Everyday

Committing to reading aloud every single day is perhaps the best promise I made to my students and even myself this school year. The simple practice of reading aloud a different picture book every single day with my class has changed us in ways that I did not even expect.

Earlier this week, I had the privilege of spending an afternoon with elementary teachers in the Los Gatos School District to share the benefits of read aloud. We spent two hours engaging in a few read alouds, discussing our thinking and ideas, sharing great books with each other, and committing/recommitting to this powerful classroom practice. It was a refreshing and invigorating way to spend the afternoon after our collective teaching days. The next day, we all walked back into our classrooms excited about the reading and discussions to come!

Here are ten of the points we discussed in depth at our session earlier this week…

1- Read aloud sets us up to model a love of reading.

2- Each read aloud provides every student in class a shared experience with every single other student in class.

3- Read Aloud provides a predictable context for laughing, thinking, and learning together.

4- Reading aloud offers the entire classroom community access to books as mirrors, windows, and sliding glass doors (Dr. Rudine Sims Bishop, 1990)

5- Read aloud gives each of our students the opportunity to feel validated and visible when we make the commitment to ensure they are each represented in our book choices.

6- Read aloud together paired with discussion and modeling of strategies provides access to more complex texts and ideas- especially with social studies and science concepts that may be new or unfamiliar.

7- Read aloud is the perfect introduction or way to kick off independent reading for the day. Offering visibility of the decision making process that a reader goes through is a great way to teach a quick lesson before students set off to read on their own. Read aloud and talk makes the often invisible process of reading and meaning making visible. 

8- Read aloud has the potential to give students leadership roles and decision making power in the classroom when teachers invite students to choose and share class read aloud books.

9- Read aloud is an instructional method that appeals to all students of all ages, from pre-kindergarten through college level learners.

10- Read aloud is a joyful and reflective part of our day everyday! Simply put, we need more joy and reflection in all of our classrooms and schools.

Let’s continue the conversation! I’d love to hear your thoughts on read aloud and chat more.

-Christina

View all of our classroom read alouds so far this year here…

Made with Padlet

New Year Message: Three Connected Promises to My Students and Myself

As I prepare to head back to my fifth graders on Monday refreshed and recharged after a wonderful winter break full of family, friends, and adventures, I’m going to work on keeping a few promises to myself and my students that I quietly (and some not so quietly) made at the beginning of the school year…

Promise 1: I am going to make a greater effort to ensure my teaching is anti-racist, anti-homophobic, anti-oppressive, and inclusive of all who enter my doors and who live outside those doors. This promise is a continual work in progress. It’s one I quietly made a while back, and I now realize keeping it quiet is not the way to proceed. As a white, cisgender teacher, writer, and speaker in the education field, I see it as a moral imperative. I owe it to my students, my colleagues, my peers across the country, and children everywhere. To engage in this continual work, I’m listening, watching, reading, and trying to recognize my privilege at every step. It can be uncomfortable at times, and it can be downright shocking at others, yet is is something I must continue to engage in. I know I am making mistakes, and I know I will make mistakes in the future. The key is to recognize those mistakes, honestly admit to them, remedy them, and do better next time. One thing I know I need to do as well is to step back and give voice to others- I need to recognize whose voice is missing in my classroom, whose is over represented, and take steps to make representation more inclusive. This could be an entire blog post on its own so I’ll stop here for now. If you’re interested in also making this promise to yourself and your students, here is a list of resources that helped me start this work.

This is not a complete list, rather it is simply where I started on my path with this work. These sites, the resources they provide, and ideas they challenged me to ponder have helped me grow immensely as an educator and a human. I’d love to see your resources as well- as I said, I am listening and learning.

Promise 2: Everyday, no matter what, we will engage in independent choice reading and read aloud in the classroom. So far, this promise that I vocally made back in August has been kept. Each and every day my 5th graders come into the classroom at 8:00, put away their materials, take care of tasks such as signing up for lunch, and then engage in independent choice reading for 15-30 minutes. On days when I announce we’ll continue independent reading through 8:45, cheers erupt! More on the why and how of our daily independent reading can be found here and here. In addition to daily independent reading, we’re also engaging in daily read aloud. Everyday we read a picture book together as a community. On most days, we also have a novel read aloud. More on the why and how of daily read aloud can be found here and here. A critical component of this promise has been continually searching for classroom library books and read alouds that represent all of my students, their families, our community members, and those who we discover are missing from our shelves. Frequently consulting The Nerdy Book Club, School Library Journal, and We Need Diverse Books helps with this ongoing process.

Promise 3: I will simplify and say no.  At an NCTE session a couple years back, I heard Penny Kittle respond to the question, How do you fit it all in? by saying, “I don’t.” These two simple, yet powerful words struck a nerve in me. I feel that they released me. They forced me to question what I was doing and ask why I was trying to take on everything at all times. However, I only started applying this idea a few months ago at the beginning of the school year. The first thing I did was remove my school email from my phone. There is nothing wrong, and everything right, with not being a complete workaholic. It is possible to both be a completely dedicated educator and to set personal and professional boundaries. When I was working every moment, I was not taking care of myself, and I certainly was not bringing my best self to my students. I also took a look at everything I did in my classroom and really asked which practices made a difference in my students’ learning lives and which were just filler. I made my best effort to eliminate the filler. I will continue to do so. Less truly is more when it comes to good teaching. Identifying what matters and saying no to everything else makes a huge difference. A few other things I’ve done to simplify and say no…

  • I removed myself from a couple committees at work that had no impact on my students or my own professional growth. I gave my all to everyone for a while, and now realize it’s ok to allow others to fill those jobs.
  • I removed Facebook from my phone. This is something I did only a few days ago while on vacation. Facebook can be a huge rabbit hole and waster of time if one allows it to be- self admittedly, I allowed it to be! There are a few things I appreciate about Facebook, and I can still visit those once a day while sitting at my computer. Endlessly scrolling through the Facebook feed does not have to be a continual part of my day. Deleting the app from my phone has been the best move I’ve made in 2019 so far. It’s been rather freeing!
  • In 2019, I will only say yes to things I want to do and believe in. This may be my biggest challenge. One of my fears in life is letting others down. However, I can’t make time for things that matter to me if I continually make time for things that don’t. I’m sure I will think more on this and revisit this idea through writing in the future.

From the outside looking in at this blog post, it may appear that these three promises are not connected. Yet, I see them all living within each other. By simplifying my life and saying no more often, I am making more room for the things that matter to me and my students: sound literacy practices and anti-oppressive actions in the classroom and in my life outside of school. Come to think of it, a sound literacy practice is anti-oppressive. It’s not something that just happens. It’s something that is a work in progress. I’d love your help on this journey. I’m listening and learning. 

Cheers to a happy, healthy, inclusive,
and intentional 2019!
-Christina

4 Practical Tips to Keep Students Reading Over Winter Break

Winter break is quickly approaching! Whether your school break is one, two, or three weeks in duration, the fact is that these upcoming days off are still valuable ones in the lives of all readers, regardless of their grade in school or stage of reading development. From kindergarteners to high schoolers, and even beyond, reading matters (for more on why reading matters, I highly recommend this 2015 blog post from Donalyn Miller).  To keep students reading over break, here are four practical tips that I have seen work in the past, and that I plan to make use of in my nine teaching days before winter break.

1. Provide access to books. Books cannot be read if access is not granted. Consider taking a small bit of time to spruce up the classroom library- highlight a few book boxes, enlist students in organizing books in a way that makes sense to them (students love creating book boxes in the library!), and refer to the library as often as possible throughout the day. Make it the focal point of everything in the classroom. Also, consider asking your school librarian for support with book access. Perhaps your class can spend some time in the library before winter break. Take a look here if you’re still thinking of ways to grow and maintain your classroom library.

Screen Shot 2018-12-08 at 9.15.59 AM

2. Once access is established, invite kids to freely choose a few books to take home. As JK Rowling reminds us, “If you don’t like to read, you haven’t found the right book.” And, according to Allington and Gabriel (2012), “Students read more, understand more, and are more likely to continue reading when they have the opportunity to choose what they read.” This applies not only to children, but also to adolescents, teens, and adults as well. Before winter break arrives, consider spending some time in class inviting students to choose a few books to take home. It is more likely they will read at home if they get to pick out the reading material themselves. Worried about losing books from your classroom library? Simply ask students to keep track of the books they have borrowed- rarely do books not come back, but it can happen. There is always a risk of a couple books being lost, but the risk is even greater for students if books sit unread on shelves over break instead of in the hands of readers. Books are meant to be read, not collected on shelves.  If inviting students to choose their own books is new to you and your readers, Kari Yates and I have a few tips and tricks to support students in book choice.

Screen Shot 2018-12-09 at 5.02.42 PM

3. Make a plan with Your Readers. One of the habits of healthy readers is consistently making plans for reading. By inviting students to think about when they’ll read, where they’ll read, what they’ll read, and possibly with whom they’ll read over the break, they are more likely to actually read. These plans can be jotted in notebooks, written in planners or calendars, typed up, and even shared with friends and family. As human beings, we’re more likely to do something that we make specific plans to do. We’re even more likely to do something when we share those plans with others. Reading is so critical in the growth of all students, we can’t just leave it to chance. Taking time to make a plan has the power to increase the chances of students reading over the break from school.

Screen Shot 2018-12-09 at 4.50.10 PM

4. Let students know that the first day after winter break they will chat about their reading. One of the most authentic ways to respond to reading is to invite conversation. Before students leave for the break, let them know that the class is going to casually chat about their winter break reading upon return. This chat, and ones like it, are not an assignment, a method for accountability, or a ‘gotcha’ in any way. Rather, they are what we do- we regularly chat about books. We chat about them in our daily morning meetings, during reading workshop, and often times through more visual means (as seen below). When talk and interaction around books becomes a way of life in the classroom, students will read more. They will want to get in on the action and connection that reading offers. They will want to be a part of the conversation. If chat around books is new to you, or if you’re looking for different ideas, you can find some support here and here.

Screen Shot 2018-12-09 at 5.04.42 PM

As a recap…

1. Provide access to books.

2. Invite kids to freely choose a few books to take home.

3. Make a plan with Your Readers.

4. Remind students about upcoming chats about reading after break.

I’d love to hear your thoughts and what you plan to do to encourage your students to keep the reading going over break!  Happy reading, friends!

 

Allington & Gabriel. 2012. “Every Child, Every Day.” Educational Leadership 69: 10-15.

 

Screen Shot 2018-05-01 at 8.16.38 PM

My first book for teachers, To Know and Nurture a Reader: Conferring with Confidence and Joy, cowritten with Kari Yates, is now out and available from Stenhouse Publishers. Our goal with this book was to help teachers make the important practice of conferring with readers manageable, effective, and joyful! 

It’s Monday! What are you reading? 11/19/18… We Got This

Okay, okay. It’s Tuesday, not Monday. Yesterday was my travel day after an incredible four days of connecting and learning at The National Council of Teachers of English Annual Convention (NCTE18). After a few nights of restless sleep, a flight delay due to smoke in The Bay Area, and a much needed dinner of decompression with dear friends, I let Monday slip by without mentioning my reading.

IMG_0839

Cornelius’ ideas and insight kept me company as I was squished in the back of my United flight in seat 25D. 

However, I did not let the day slip by without getting some great reading in. My friend and teaching mentor, Cornelius Minor, just published a much needed book in the field, We Got This: Equity, Access, and the Quest to Be Who Our Students Need Us to Be.  This much needed book kept me company on my four hour flight from Houston to San Francisco.

 

I am so excited to share his book with my colleagues- in fact, the friends I met for dinner last night were my two teaching partners. As they previewed the book, while we were waiting for our food, they kept saying, “This is what we need. This is a needed book!” Obviously, I concur. Rather than summarizing or pulling out key points, I’ll end with a quote from the book’s introduction…

“I am not OK with a world where only some people – the ones who were born on the right side of town or the ones who happen to make the right friends- get a shot at success…

As teachers, we cannot guarantee outcomes- that all kids will start businesses, lead their families, and contribute in their communities- but we can guarantee access. We can ensure that everyone gets a shot.”  -Cornelius Minor, pg. xvi

Access. Access is everything. Thank you for this work, Cornelius. I am so excited to join you and many others in this important and vital work for our society.

Friends, if you’re also reading We Got This, I’d love to chat!

 

 

You can find more of my current professional reads, 5th grade classroom read alouds, and my relax reads here. Happy reading, friends!

Screen Shot 2018-05-01 at 8.16.38 PM

 

My first book for teachers, To Know and Nurture a Reader: Conferring with Confidence and Joy, cowritten with Kari Yates, is now out and available from Stenhouse Publishers. Our goal with this book was to help teachers make the important practice of conferring with readers manageable, effective, and joyful! 

 

 

 

It’s Monday! What are you reading? 11/12/18

As I prepare to head off to my favorite weekend of the entire year, the annual NCTE convention, I am revisiting a few books that have played a role in shaping my path as a literacy educator. Today, I am giving much of my attention to two texts that have had a huge impact on the language choices I make in my classroom.

Screen Shot 2018-11-12 at 6.52.09 AM

Jan Burkins and Kim Yaris challenged me to grow as an educator by shifting the bulk of the work to my students in their groundbreaking book, Who’s Doing the Work? Since its release in 2016, it has been read and reread in heavy rotation as a part of my professional reading life. Jan and Kim have truly helped me say less and choose my words carefully to elevate my students’ learning.

 

Screen Shot 2018-11-12 at 7.00.53 AM

My writing partner, Kari Yates, and I have been thinking deeply about talk lately. Specifically, we have been thinking about how our teacher language impacts the relationships with and learning of our students. A pivotal text that has helped guide my thinking here is Peter Johnston’s Choice Words. This book is a gift to the profession.

 

You can find more of my current professional reads, 5th grade classroom read alouds, and my relax reads here. Happy reading, friends!

 

 

Screen Shot 2018-05-01 at 8.16.38 PM

 

My first book for teachers, To Know and Nurture a Reader: Conferring with Confidence and Joy, cowritten with Kari Yates, is now out and available from Stenhouse Publishers. Our goal with this book was to help teachers make the important practice of conferring with readers manageable, effective, and joyful!